The E33 Sail Plan

E33 OVERVIEW

DESIGNER: Bruce Kelley

PRODUCTION: 1983-1986

HULLS: More than 220

 


E33 SPECIFICATIONS

LOA: 32'7"

LWL: 27'6"

BEAM: 11'6"

DRAFT: 4'6"

DSPL: 11,350lbs

BALLAST: 4,600lbs
(internal lead)

MAST: 48'9' DWL

SAIL AREA: 539.5 sq ft

100% FT: 310.5 sqft

MAIN: 228.15 sq ft

I = 45'

J = 13'10"

P = 39'

E = 11'9"

See Rigging Specifications for specifics

 


HEADROOM: 6'2"

BERTHS: 6

FUEL: 36 gal (diesel)

WATER: 36 gal (hot/cold)

HOLDING TANK: 12.5 gal

 


E33 STATISTICS

D/L RATIO: 244
(less than 100 = ULDB
100-200 = light,
200-300 = medium,
+300 = heavy)

SA/D RATIO: 17.09
(14 = low, 22 = high)

BAL/D RATIO: 40.5
(33-45 is average, higher=more stablitiy)

LWL/BEAM: 2.39
(2.3=low, 2.7=medium, 3.0=high)

CAPSIZE RATIO: 2.05
(Less than 2.0 is prefered)

MOTION COMFORT: 23.18
(RANGE = 5 - 60: Higher number means more comfort in a sea)

HULL SPEED: 7.03 knt

 


PDF DOWNLOADS

E33 BROCHURES:
E33 Sail Plan (334k)
E33 Brochure (3.4mb)
E33 Promo (250k)
E33 Spec Sheet (123k)

D E S I G N&H I S T O R Y

The Endeavour 33 was introduced in 1983 and ended production in 1986 with just over 220 hulls made. The E33 is considered part of the second generation of Endeavour sailboats. With new racing rules and the desire by cruisers to sail faster, Endeavour began emphasizing larger, stronger, and faster designs.
Bruce Kelley was brought in to draw the lines for a fresh, new design that would be large, strong, and fast. The result was an exciting new design that combined elegance, comfortable accommodations, and performance that became the Endeavour 33. In a departure from older design (CCA, IOR) and building techniques (solid, hand laid GRP) at Endeavour, the 33 represented a package of state of the art hull form and construction methods.

 

H U L L&D E C K

Building materials, proven over a decade in the punishing SORC and World championship offshore racing brought a new definition to performance cursing. The new Endeavour 33 uses a one piece, hand-laminated hull, cored with Klegecell, a rigid closed–cell polyvinyl foam. Increased strength comes from the use of laminates composed of non-woven unidirectional rovings. Additional structural strength is enhanced by a one piece multi-axial steel reinforced fiberglass grid bonded to the hull, providing a stronger & rigid unit.
The hull is molded as a single unit of a combination of polyester resin and fiberglass woven roving and multidirectional chopped strand fiber (MCSF). The keel is molded integrally with the hull and all ballast is contained inside. The deck and cockpit, like the hull, are molded as a single unit of a combination of polyester resin and fiberglass woven roving and MCSF. Plywood coring is incorporated between layers of fiberglass in the cabin top, deck, seat, and cockpit sole areas to give additional stiffness. The non-skid finish is molded into the deck. The exterior finish is pigmented gelcoat molded onto the fiberglass. The boot and sheer stripe are sprayed on Imron in Standard Blue #24160.
The hull-to-deck joint is a 'flange' type, which during assembly, is liberally coated with a combination adhesive/sealant. The deck is then lowered onto the hull and fastened in place with stainless steel thru-bolts. The toe rail is then installed, bedded in a heavy layer of the same compound and secured in place.

 

B A L L A S T

All ballast is internally mounted inside the keel, which is molded integrally with the hull. Cast pieces of lead are place in the hull, encapsulated in a polyester bonding resin, and then covered with a layer of woven roving to form a fiberglass cap. When finished, the ballast becomes a structural part of the hull.

 

R U D D E R&S T E E R I N G

The rudder is molded as a single piece of solid high density foam with a protective skin of fiberglass and a gelcoat finish. The rudder post, molded integrally with the rudder, is solid stainless steel, which is welded to a steel blade in the interior of the rudder. Where the rudder post passes through the hull, water tightness is ensured by means of a stuffing box.
The pedestal steering system (24" Edson wheel) operates with stainless steel cables rotating a quadrant bolted and keyed to the rudder post. The quadrant can be accessed via a removable locker drop box in the aft lazarette. The emergency steering rudder is stored under the port settee and is inserted into a deck flange behind the steering wheel post if needed.

 

S P A R S&R I G G I N G

The Endeavor 33 uses a double spreader rig and larger 539.5 sq. foot sail area. She is designed to perform with a 110% genoa. This combination of high aspect sail plan and short genoa overlap makes sail handling and tacking a breeze.
All spars (mast, boom, and spreaders) are extruded aluminum 6061-T6 alloy, with a protective coating an all external surfaces. The main mast on the E33 is stepped through the deck to the keel on a steel mast step below the cabin sole. The masts and booms we've seen on the E33 were Isomat double spreader masts, and booms with double reefing capabilities and the mainsheet traveler about 2/3s the way aft attached to the deck top just forward of the companionway slider hatch.
The standing rigging is made of stainless steel wire. The forestay attaches to the stem head fitting at the bow. This is fabricated of welded stainless steel backup plates and through bolted to the hull. All other stays and shrouds are attached to chainplates at the edge of the deck and are through bolted to the hull or bulkheads below deck. Additional fiberglass reinforcement is molded into the hull in all chainplate areas.
All halyards were originally stainless steel wire rope with Dacron line tails to minimize stretch and reduce windage. All halyards are run externally to #32 Lewmar winches mounted on the mast. Sheets are led to #40 Lewmar self tailing winches in the cockpit.

 

I N T E R I O R

The interior of the Endeavour 33 is a molded fiberglass unit with teak bulkheads and cabinetry fastened to it with screws, bolts, and adhesives. The entire unit is pre-assembled outside the boat and then placed inside a hull with ballast and engine already in place. It is bonded in place with woven roving and mat, that when completed, forms a single unit structure having great strength and rigidity.
The interior with 6’2” headroom is finished with varnished teak with soft white overheads. The removable cabin sole is teak with holly inlays. The interior layout is typical with a V-berth forward, the head (to port) and wet and dry lockers (starboard) divide it from the main salon area which has a fold-up teak dining table. The L shaped port side settee re-arranges with a removable back to create a double berth. The settee starboard is a single. Aft and to port is a pilot double berth and to starboard is the galley which originally came with an icebox and either a gimbaled 3-burner alcohol or gas stove with oven. The Lorco Marine electrical panel is located portside next to the navigation station. The stairs remove to allow access to the engine which has some access also from the cockpit starboard locker.
There are 10 opening Lexan ports (Beckson) with screens and two large Atkins-Hoyle deck hatches (strong drop forged aluminum with 3/4" Lexan), one each over the v-berth and salon area. Early model boats had 6 opening and 4 large fixed ports.

 

A U X I L A R Y

All Endeavour 33s came with fresh water cooled Yanmar diesel auxiliaries—either a 22.5 HP Yanmar (2QM20 2-cyl) with 2.81 to 1 reduction gear or the 3GMF (27hp 3-cyl) with a 2.61 geared transmission.
The propeller shaft is made of 1" stainless steel and exits the hull through a stuffing box. It is supported at the inboard, or engine end, by the shaft coupling, and at the aft end by a cutless bearing in a cast bronze strut.
The propeller is a 16" 2-blade prop although a 3-blade was an option.
The exhaust system utilizes the Vernalift Marine muffler. In Yanmar engines, the raw water pump draws water through the engine intake port, circulates it through the engine block (or around it through a heat exchanger for FW cooled), and then into the muffler. The water is mixed with the exhaust gases in the muffler and discharged overboard through the exhaust port.

Fuel Tank
The fuel tank is built of welded marine grade aluminum with internal baffles, and is positioned under the starboard settee.

 

E L E C T R I C A LS Y S T E M

Most wiring is located high and accessible by removing ceiling panels from under the side decks. Some wiring runs along the spine under the cabin sole. All wiring is 10 gauge stranded copper with crimp type connectors used at all junctions or terminals. All wiring is color coded with DC wiring as two wire and AC as three wire. Metallic fittings (through hulls, etc.) below the water line are electrically bonded together with 8 gauge copper wire and connected to the ship's common ground. The standard battery configuration consisted of two 12-volt house batteries (group 27) connected in parallel to allow single or combined use and charged from the stock 35 amp Hitachi alternator.

 

S OW H A TD O E ST H I SA L LM E A N ?

The E33 is a well built boat typical of the 1980’s. So how does the boat really sail?

E33 performs well when close to the wind, regularly as close as 45° in a breeze, less so in lighter air. To maximize light air performance a 150% roller furling genoa is common. The E33 is easily sail balanced when sailing up or down wind and can easily achieve 7 knots when conditions are right. One admirable characteristic of the E33 is that the hull almost never pounds in a seaway and the boat can be easily handled by a small crew, even single-handed. It's a simple, forgiving, well balanced cruising boat. It’s a rare event to put the toerail in the water which helps keep the crew comfortable.